How Do I Paint Roman Legionaries?

Steps 1 to 14

Steps 1 to 14

1.- The figure as it comes out of the blister, plenty of extra material from the production process
2.- The figure cleaned and sanded
3.- [Spray] An undercoat of Chaos Black
4.- [Brush 0] Boltgun Metal for the armor and other metal pieces
5.- [Brush 0] Skull White for the tunic
6.- [Brush 0] Bronzed Flesh for the flesh, obviously!
7.- [Brush 0] Bestial Brown for the belts, sword scarab and other details
8.- [Brush 0] Shinning Gold for the groin guard and other details
9.- [Brush 0] Snakebite Leather for the back of the shield
10.- [Brush 0] Goblin Green for the shield
11.- [Brush 0] Bad Moon Yellow fot the shield’s border and center piece
12.- [Brush 3/0] Shinning Gold for the shield’s pattern
13.- [Brush 3/0] Dark Angels Green for the shield’s pattern
14.- The assembled miniature

Steps 15 to 17

Steps 15 to 17

15.- [Brush 3/0] Edges and raised Boltgun Metal elements highlighted with Mithril Silver
16.- [Brush 3/0] Edges and raised Bestial Brown elements highlighted with Bestial Brown mixed with Skull White
17.- [Brush 3/0] Edges and raised Bronzed Flesh elements highlighted with Bronzed Flesh mixed with Skull White

Step 18

Step 18

18.- Before continuing all miniatures are placed in their base

Steps 19 to 21

Steps 19 to 21

19.- [Soft Brush] Washing with Black Ink
20.- [Soft Brush] Gloss varnish with ‘Ard Coat
21.- [Spray] Satin varnish with Purity Seal

Roman Legions on the Principate

The Legions were composed of Roman citizens mainly drawn from Italy at first with a lot more coming from the Iberia provinces, Gallia and others by the end of the first century AD.

During approximately the first half of the Principate the legio was divided into ten cohortes plus a small number of mounted men known as the equites legionis. This cavalry unit was mainly devoted to communication, logistics and other non-combat activities and so the Roman Army of the Principate relied on auxiliary forces to provide mounted forces.

Early Principate Legion Organization

Early Principate Legion Organization

Each cohors was composed of six centuriae and each centuria comprised 10 contubernia of eight men each that fought, slept and trained together forming strong bonds within them.  The theoretical strength of a Roman legion was then 8 x 10 x 6 x 10 = 4.800 men

If you’re wondering why a unit of 80 men (10 contubernia of 8 men each) was called centuria (latin word for a hundred), the answer lies in two additional men allocated to each contubernium for non fighting duties, raising the total number to 100 (20 additional men per centuria)

At some time during the Principate, probably at the beginning of the Flavian era, the first cohors or cohors prima was reorganized to include five centuriae of 20 contubernia each and including the most veteran legionaries

Late Principate Roman Legion

Late Principate Roman Legion

In battle the Legio typically formed in what was called triplex acies with four cohortes in front and then two lines of three cohortes each in a kind of checker board pattern, even if it could use a two line deployment at times.

Legion Formed in Triplex Acies

Legion Formed in Triplex Acies

Roman Army of the Principate

The Roman Principate comprises the period of time starting in 27 BC when Octavian was designated Augustus and Princeps by the Roman Senate and ending with the death of Trajan in AD 117. This period is also commonly known as the Early Roman Empire and was signed by a relative peace all across the Roman territory

Augustus decided to transform the Army into a fully professional force solely under the command of the Emperor even if he kept many of the names and terms of the dying Republic

The legion continued to be the core of the Army but its men were enlisted for a fixed period of time instead of the length of a campaign and there was a defined reward after honorable discharge from the service usually in money or land

The auxiliary forces were reorganized and given a regular status with training and service terms similar to that of legionaries, except that most auxilia were offered Roman Citizenship as the reward for their life at the Army

Finally the number of auxiliaries began to increase until they became a part as large of the Army than that of legionaries and often of similar fighting quality

No Google Analytics

Today I found out that WordPress doesn’t support Google Analytics… this is serious blow to the convenience of WordPress as my blogging environment

In any case I will give a try to the build in statistics, perhaps they could work for me

Added DBA page

I have added some content to the De Bellis Antiquitatis page and it wasn’t that bad after all, maybe WordPress is the place to stay… only time will tell

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Disappointed, but not that much

At first I thought pages would allow me to add some structure into my posts, beyond the traditional tags and categories, so for example I could keep my Ancient, Napoleonic and WWII related post separated, but that’s not the way it works… a little bit disappointing

On the other hand pages do allow to add static and structured content to the blog which is good enough… some times blogs look just like an endless stream of raw data and I hope pages could help put some, and only some, order into the chaos

New to WordPress

I’ve been using blogger, the google blogging community, for a few months now but I feel it is too difficult to produce the look I would like for my blogs and posts. After some short research¬† I’ve decided to try WordPress… I really hope it delivers more control and features than blogger or I will be on the move sooner than later!